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Corgi - Cardigan Welsh - International Stock Dog Registry
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Corgi – Cardigan Welsh

Corgi – Cardigan Welsh

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is older than the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, with the Pembroke being bred out of the Cardigan.

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is older than the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, with the Pembroke being bred out of the Cardigan. Both Corgi varieties may be a descendant of the Keeshond, Pomeranian, Schipperkes and the Swedish Vallhund. Some say the older Cardigan was from Cardiganshire brought there by the Celts in 1200 BC. Whereas, the Pembroke’s ancestors were introduced by Flemish weavers to the Celts in the 1100s. Whatever the case may be, the Cardigan and the Pembroke Welsh Corgis were interbred and considered the same breed up until 1934, when a show judge thought they were too different and separated them into two different breeds. After they were separated the Pembroke gained in popularity and is to this day more popular than the Cardigan. The name “corgi” is specific to that type of dog breed in Cymreig (Welsh). “Dog” in Cymreig (Welsh) is ‘Ci’ or if it is softly mutated ‘Gi,’ hence Corgi. The Pembroke was actually recognized by the AKC a year before the Cardigan. The Cardigan was recognized in 1935 and the Pembroke in 1934. Corgis were used as cattle drivers, vermin hunters and farm guards. They drove cattle by barking and nipping at the cattle’s heels rather than just herding them. The dog’s low stature helped him roll out of the way of kicking cows.

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